• About Jack Reed

    About Jack Reed

    4/15/2011 — 

    Throughout his career in the United States Congress, Jack Reed has been an advocate for working-class families.

  • Reed Announces $150,000 Small Business Grant for Sustainable Development Collaboration between RISD & Brown/RI-CIE

    Reed Announces $150,000 Small Business Grant for Sustainable Development Collaboration between RISD & Brown/RI-CIE

    3/25/2011 — 
    enator Reed attends a press conference on the RISD & Brown/RI-CIE Partnership for Sustainable Development.
    At the press conference, Reed announced a $150,000 grant from the federal Small Business Administration to the Rhode Island School of Design and Brown University that will be used to fund a sustainable housing project that creates living spaces out of shipping containers.
    From the Providence Journal: 
    By: Gina Macris
    The award, called the Partnership for Sustainable Development, aims to create connections between academia, business and government to fuel the emerging knowledge economy.
    The business partner in the Brown-RISD collaboration is a start-up company planned by the two RISD-trained architects who created the innovative Box Office complex from recycled shipping containers in the West End.
    Architects Peter Gill Case and Joe Haskett propose to re-use shipping containers as affordable and sustainable housing that can be shipped anywhere and easily installed, running off the power grid.
    The announcement came at a news conference hosted by RISD President John Maeda and Provost Jessie Shefrin, which showcased the roles that are being played by various contributors to the collaboration.
    Reed said the partnership recognizes the different talents needed to turn a vision into reality. He said the project addresses multifaceted needs for housing, jobs, sustainable energy and economic competitiveness.
    Maeda, using a military analogy, said that the “best offense is a great defense,” and “innovation is the greatest defense right now.”
    RISD and the Rhode Island Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship at Brown (RI-CIE) will share the SBA grant money equally. Design expertise from RISD and business acumen from RI-CIE will assist Case and Haskett as they try to commercialize and market the modular housing.
    RISD is using its half of the grant to fund a semester-long course called Re-Box that is being taught by architecture professors Peter Dean and Markus Berger. Sixteen architecture and industrial design students are developing their own designs for recycling shipping containers. Via RI-CIE at Brown, the RISD students have access to advisers in business, marketing, industrial product development, sustainable energy and the like, according to a statement.
    Architects Case and Haskett are offering critiques to the student projects. The results of the semester-long experience will be available both to the SBA and to Case and Haskett’s new start-up, UbiGO, named with the intention that its housing module will be able to go anywhere, Haskett said.
    While the Box Office has received worldwide attention, Haskett said developing a product from the ground up will be a new experience for him and Case. Haskett said he and his partner will receive specialized business and entrepreneurial expertise from RI-CIE.

    Senator Reed attends a press conference on the RISD & Brown/RI-CIE Partnership for Sustainable Development.

    At the press conference, Reed announced a $150,000 grant from the federal Small Business Administration to the Rhode Island School of Design and Brown University that will be used to fund a sustainable housing project that creates living spaces out of shipping containers.


    Providence Journal:

     RISD, Brown to share SBA grant to create modular housing from shipping containers

    By: Gina Macris

    The award, called the Partnership for Sustainable Development, aims to create connections between academia, business and government to fuel the emerging knowledge economy.

    The business partner in the Brown-RISD collaboration is a start-up company planned by the two RISD-trained architects who created the innovative Box Office complex from recycled shipping containers in the West End.

    Architects Peter Gill Case and Joe Haskett propose to re-use shipping containers as affordable and sustainable housing that can be shipped anywhere and easily installed, running off the power grid.

    The announcement came at a news conference hosted by RISD President John Maeda and Provost Jessie Shefrin, which showcased the roles that are being played by various contributors to the collaboration.

    Reed said the partnership recognizes the different talents needed to turn a vision into reality. He said the project addresses multifaceted needs for housing, jobs, sustainable energy and economic competitiveness.

    Maeda, using a military analogy, said that the “best offense is a great defense,” and “innovation is the greatest defense right now.”

    RISD and the Rhode Island Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship at Brown (RI-CIE) will share the SBA grant money equally. Design expertise from RISD and business acumen from RI-CIE will assist Case and Haskett as they try to commercialize and market the modular housing.

    RISD is using its half of the grant to fund a semester-long course called Re-Box that is being taught by architecture professors Peter Dean and Markus Berger. Sixteen architecture and industrial design students are developing their own designs for recycling shipping containers. Via RI-CIE at Brown, the RISD students have access to advisers in business, marketing, industrial product development, sustainable energy and the like, according to a statement.

    Architects Case and Haskett are offering critiques to the student projects. The results of the semester-long experience will be available both to the SBA and to Case and Haskett’s new start-up, UbiGO, named with the intention that its housing module will be able to go anywhere, Haskett said.

    While the Box Office has received worldwide attention, Haskett said developing a product from the ground up will be a new experience for him and Case. Haskett said he and his partner will receive specialized business and entrepreneurial expertise from RI-CIE.

  • Reed Visits May E. Fogarty Elementary School 2nd Graders
  • Reed Visits Flood-Affected Business in Westerly

    Reed Visits Flood-Affected Business in Westerly

    3/14/2011 — 
    WESTERLY, RI -- U.S. Senator Jack Reed (D-RI) today visited the Westerly NAPA Auto Parts store to meet with business owner Jamie Silvestri and his employees.  Although the business was devastated by last year’s historic flood, Mr. Silvestri, with the help of the local community, has been able to rebuild and expand.
     
    Mr. Silvestri’s family has run the auto parts shop in Westerly for over 60 years, and the company also has branches in Mystic and Colchester, Connecticut.
     
    When the Westerly shop on Canal Street was hit by flooding last year, the store’s inventory was wiped out and the business interruption insurance policy did not cover hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of flood damage.  However, with the help of friends, customers, volunteers, and financial aid from the Westerly Chamber of Commerce’s Flood Assistance Program and $300,000 in federal Small Business Administration (SBA) assistance, Mr. Silvestri managed to keep his auto parts shop afloat and reopened for business in the old EbLens location on Granite Street.  
     
    “We have come a long way, but there are many local businesses that are still recovering from the flood, and I want to ensure they get the assistance they need,” said Senator Reed.  “Mr. Silvestri is a great example of someone who was able to turn tragedy into opportunity.  His business  was hit hard by the flooding.  But through hard work and determination, and with the help of his neighbors and customers, and support from the SBA, his business is not just recovering from the flood -- it is growing.” 
     
    Reed also noted that during the flooding, after the auto parts shop had to be evacuated due to safety reasons, Mr. Silvestri spent the next two days working around the clock in his capacity as a volunteer firefighter, selflessly devoting his efforts toward helping others in need.
     
    “When times are tough, it is heartening to see people come together and lend a hand to those in need.  I salute Mr. Silvestri and his employees for their efforts, and I’m pleased that through it all, they are maintaining their commitment to serve the community here in Westerly,” concluded Reed.  
     
    To date, more than $100 million in direct federal aid has already been allocated to Rhode Island to help families and businesses recover from last year’s historic flood.

    WESTERLY, RI -- U.S. Senator Jack Reed (D-RI) today visited the Westerly NAPA Auto Parts store to meet with business owner Jamie Silvestri and his employees.  Although the business was devastated by last year’s historic flood, Mr. Silvestri, with the help of the local community, has been able to rebuild and expand.

    Mr. Silvestri’s family has run the auto parts shop in Westerly for over 60 years, and the company also has branches in Mystic and Colchester, Connecticut.

    When the Westerly shop on Canal Street was hit by flooding last year, the store’s inventory was wiped out and the business interruption insurance policy did not cover hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of flood damage.  However, with the help of friends, customers, volunteers, and financial aid from the Westerly Chamber of Commerce’s Flood Assistance Program and $300,000 in federal Small Business Administration (SBA) assistance, Mr. Silvestri managed to keep his auto parts shop afloat and reopened for business in the old EbLens location on Granite Street.  

    “We have come a long way, but there are many local businesses that are still recovering from the flood, and I want to ensure they get the assistance they need,” said Senator Reed.  “Mr. Silvestri is a great example of someone who was able to turn tragedy into opportunity.  His business  was hit hard by the flooding.  But through hard work and determination, and with the help of his neighbors and customers, and support from the SBA, his business is not just recovering from the flood -- it is growing.” 

    Reed also noted that during the flooding, after the auto parts shop had to be evacuated due to safety reasons, Mr. Silvestri spent the next two days working around the clock in his capacity as a volunteer firefighter, selflessly devoting his efforts toward helping others in need.

    “When times are tough, it is heartening to see people come together and lend a hand to those in need.  I salute Mr. Silvestri and his employees for their efforts, and I’m pleased that through it all, they are maintaining their commitment to serve the community here in Westerly,” concluded Reed.  

    To date, more than $100 million in direct federal aid has already been allocated to Rhode Island to help families and businesses recover from last year’s historic flood.

  • Reed Visits Flood-Affected Business in Westerly

    Reed Visits Flood-Affected Business in Westerly

    3/14/2011 — 

    March 14, 2011 WESTERLY, RI -- U.S. Senator Jack Reed (D-RI) today visited the Westerly NAPA Auto Parts store to meet with business owner Jamie Silvestri and his employees. Although the business was devastated by last year’s historic flood, Mr. Silvestri, with the help of the local community, has been able to rebuild and expand. Mr. Silvestri’s family has run the auto parts shop in Westerly for over 60 years, and the company also has branches in Mystic and Colchester, Connecticut. When the Westerly shop on Canal Street was hit by flooding last year, the store’s inventory was wiped out and the business interruption insurance policy did not cover hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of flood damage. However, with the help of friends, customers, volunteers, and financial aid from the Westerly Chamber of Commerce’s Flood Assistance Program and $300,000 in federal Small Business Administration (SBA) assistance, Mr. Silvestri managed to keep his auto parts shop afloat and reopened for business in the old EbLens location on Granite Street. “We have come a long way, but there are many local businesses that are still recovering from the flood, and I want to ensure they get the assistance they need,” said Senator Reed. “Mr. Silvestri is a great example of someone who was able to turn tragedy into opportunity. His business was hit hard by the flooding. But through hard work and determination, and with the help of his neighbors and customers, and support from the SBA, his business is not just recovering from the flood -- it is growing.” Reed also noted that during the flooding, after the auto parts shop had to be evacuated due to safety reasons, Mr. Silvestri spent the next two days working around the clock in his capacity as a volunteer firefighter, selflessly devoting his efforts toward helping others in need. “When times are tough, it is heartening to see people come together and lend a hand to those in need. I salute Mr. Silvestri and his employees for their efforts, and I’m pleased that through it all, they are maintaining their commitment to serve the community here in Westerly,” concluded Reed. To date, more than $100 million in direct federal aid has already been allocated to Rhode Island to help families and businesses recover from last year’s historic flood.

  • Reed Visits Matunuck Oyster Bar to Discuss RI’s Growing Aquaculture Industry

    Reed Visits Matunuck Oyster Bar to Discuss RI’s Growing Aquaculture Industry

    2/14/2011 — 
    MATUNUCK, RI – Today, U.S. Senator Jack Reed (D-RI), a strong advocate of shell fishermen and the state’s sustainable aquaculture industry, visited Matunuck Oyster Bar to meet with local oyster farmers to discuss Rhode Island’s growing aquaculture industry.
     
    In an effort to help oyster farmers create jobs, restore the health of the Bay, and promote ecologically sustainable development, Reed, a member of the Appropriations Committee, secured $1.5 million in 2002 to hatch the Rhode Island Aquaculture Initiative, which has increased the breadth and depth of the local aquaculture industry.  In the years following, Reed secured an additional $1.6 million in federal appropriations to boost aquaculture research facilities at Roger Williams University’s (RWU) Center for Environmental and Economic Development (CEED).  In 2010, Reed secured $500,000 for RWU’s Oyster Gardening for Restoration and Enhancement (OGRE) Program, which is seeding Narragansett Bay with oysters for habitat restoration and $300,000 to promote genetic research on shellfish. These programs have helped the state’s aquaculture grow by leaps and bounds, and it now serves as a model for other coastal states.
     
    “Sustainable aquaculture is good for the environment and good for our economy,” said Reed.  “I am proud to have secured nearly $4 million in federal funding to help local oyster farmers restore the health of the Bay and estuaries as well as provide healthy, sustainable, and delicious oysters to consumers across the country.  The industry continues to grow, and I will continue working to help the state’s aquaculture industry penetrate foreign markets.” 
     
    Today, Reed toured the award-winning Matunuck Oyster Bar, which is owned and operated by oyster farmer Perry Raso.  Mr. Raso began his oyster farm with a grant from the Reed Aquaculture initiative in 2002.  He has expanded the operation, opening the restaurant in 2009, and employed over 100 Rhode Islanders throughout the year through the farm and restaurant, which overlooks his 7-acre oyster farm in East Matunuck.  Visitors can tour the farm to see how the oysters are raised and how they get directly from the water to the plate.  
     
    Bivalves are becoming big business in the Ocean State, and world-class aquaculture research facilities at the University of Rhode Island (URI) and Roger Williams University are helping to lead the way.  According to the R.I. Coastal Resources Management Council (CRMC), there are 38 aquaculture farms currently operating in the state.  Last year Rhode Island oyster farmers produced and sold 3.6 million oysters, a major increase from just 126,000 in 1996.  Additionally, almost a million dollars worth of shellfish, including clams and mussels, were raised for various restoration projects.
     

    MATUNUCK, RI – Today, U.S. Senator Jack Reed (D-RI), a strong advocate of shell fishermen and the state’s sustainable aquaculture industry, visited Matunuck Oyster Bar to meet with local oyster farmers to discuss Rhode Island’s growing aquaculture industry.

    In an effort to help oyster farmers create jobs, restore the health of the Bay, and promote ecologically sustainable development, Reed, a member of the Appropriations Committee, secured $1.5 million in 2002 to hatch the Rhode Island Aquaculture Initiative, which has increased the breadth and depth of the local aquaculture industry.  In the years following, Reed secured an additional $1.6 million in federal appropriations to boost aquaculture research facilities at Roger Williams University’s (RWU) Center for Environmental and Economic Development (CEED).  In 2010, Reed secured $500,000 for RWU’s Oyster Gardening for Restoration and Enhancement (OGRE) Program, which is seeding Narragansett Bay with oysters for habitat restoration and $300,000 to promote genetic research on shellfish. These programs have helped the state’s aquaculture grow by leaps and bounds, and it now serves as a model for other coastal states.

    “Sustainable aquaculture is good for the environment and good for our economy,” said Reed.  “I am proud to have secured nearly $4 million in federal funding to help local oyster farmers restore the health of the Bay and estuaries as well as provide healthy, sustainable, and delicious oysters to consumers across the country.  The industry continues to grow, and I will continue working to help the state’s aquaculture industry penetrate foreign markets.” 

    Today, Reed toured the award-winning Matunuck Oyster Bar, which is owned and operated by oyster farmer Perry Raso.  Mr. Raso began his oyster farm with a grant from the Reed Aquaculture initiative in 2002.  He has expanded the operation, opening the restaurant in 2009, and employed over 100 Rhode Islanders throughout the year through the farm and restaurant, which overlooks his 7-acre oyster farm in East Matunuck.  Visitors can tour the farm to see how the oysters are raised and how they get directly from the water to the plate.  

    Bivalves are becoming big business in the Ocean State, and world-class aquaculture research facilities at the University of Rhode Island (URI) and Roger Williams University are helping to lead the way.  According to the R.I. Coastal Resources Management Council (CRMC), there are 38 aquaculture farms currently operating in the state.  Last year Rhode Island oyster farmers produced and sold 3.6 million oysters, a major increase from just 126,000 in 1996.  Additionally, almost a million dollars worth of shellfish, including clams and mussels, were raised for various restoration projects.

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